Confessions From a Receiver on the Other End of War

Sweden and the Middle East Views

Here’s a confession from Sweden: despite working in Syria and Iraq during the civil wars, the collective trauma of the wars has hit me the most when being in Sweden.

I am happy I have friends and colleagues from different countries also in Sweden. I’ve shared my views on my female friendships on this site before, several times. I’m happy I have a job where I get to offer some support to the refugees in Sweden. But the secondary traumas are creeping up on me from time to time, as well as the high cost of trying to be neutral in the midst of relationship chaos that comes from internalised conflicts.

There is one thing, according to me, that people who suffered a war have in common: distrust. And distrust can take many forms. People can become shattered. Or angry. Or hostile. Or traumatised. Or depressed. The good things…

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A Letter from the people of Mosul

Mosul Eye

Tohis Excellency, his Holiness, Pope Francis

I hope that this message finds you at your best of health,

I am writing to you about a nation being crushed by wars, dying everyday on the hands of a guerilla group claiming they carry the faith, invaded my city and destroyed it into ruins, they killed the human being, and displaced the rest, and a great number of my people are captives under their rule, while others are out in the open, nothing covers them of cold or rain.

Your Excellency Pope Francis,

I didn’t write to the King of Mecca, instead, I am writing to you, for I know you never returned a man’s hands empty, and the unjust finds their justice on your hands. We do not forget how the holy father his Holiness Pope Benedict XV during the first world war when he drew his holy care to…

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Mosul, Now and Post-ISIL – Part I – The events taking place in the city

Mosul Eye

Over the past few days I have been trying to write you somethings, but I feel I’m not capable of writing anything. Lots of pain, fear, sadness, and thinking has been haunting me lately to the point all of it is blocking from writing to you, but I decided to write never the less, about incidents happened in the past few days, family conversations, and others with people from Mosul’s old market “Bab Assarai”, a few first-hand accounts, and some news about ISIL.

The Western bank is still quite. People are anxious, but hopeful that the advances of operations on the southern front will eventually lead to put an end to all this quietness and marking the beginning of the battles. What they fear the most is the uncertainty with all this. They keep saying “Liberating Mosul’s airport will bring us hope”, because they feel the operations on the Eastern…

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Fidel Castro: Glamorizing Tyranny

Nervana

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Fidel Castro ( Getty Images)

Cuba’s revolutionary leader Fidel Castro has died at the age of 90. The legacy of Castro, the “commandante” is not just his revolutionary communism, but a grand and more disturbing stance, one that was characterized as an anti-American charismatic tyranny.

For years following the collapse of colonialism, communists, socialists, and radical Islamists have committed abhorrent crimes that have systematically been watered down by their supporters, under the pretext that America and other Western powers are worse. The depth of anti-Americanism has caused many to lose their moral compass. In the latest responses to Castro’s death, we see how many have turned a blind eye to Castro’s abhorrent, systematic repression of his opponents.

This has occurred not just for Castro, but also for Nasser of Egypt, Saddam of Iraq, and even the Assad regime of Syria. All still enjoy a good dose of popularity among…

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A little man

A whole generation ageing before time…

Levant woman

Is the world a good place to stay in?

I’d say Yes without hesitation, I don’t know how it works but I try to see the potentials in every situation I see. I don’t know why I was born in an educated family which believes in women rights and why other people were not. I do not understand its logic but it is our job to spread the word and change the world somehow.

Today I was with a friend in a business trip in a remote city, where there are few Syrian refugees. We were having tea after a long day in a café when he saw a boy he knew when he worked in a camp. The boy rushed to him and hugged him, he was very happy to see him. “Why don’t you come anymore!” he said “I missed you very much”. He was speaking in a…

View original post 619 more words

A little man

A whole generation ageing before time…

Levant woman

Is the world a good place to stay in?

I’d say Yes without hesitation, I don’t know how it works but I try to see the potentials in every situation I see. I don’t know why I was born in an educated family which believes in women rights and why other people were not. I do not understand its logic but it is our job to spread the word and change the world somehow.

Today I was with a friend in a business trip in a remote city, where there are few Syrian refugees. We were having tea after a long day in a café when he saw a boy he knew when he worked in a camp. The boy rushed to him and hugged him, he was very happy to see him. “Why don’t you come anymore!” he said “I missed you very much”. He was speaking in a…

View original post 619 more words